Have a Safe and Happy St. Paddy’s Day from all of us at Sherwood Forest Golf Club!

JOIN IN THE FUN – EVERY THURSDAY NIGHT!

STARTING – MARCH 22nd

Call the PRO SHOP to RESERVE YOUR SPOT!

559-787-2611

Sunday, March 11, 2018

First there was a draft. Then feedback. Then revisions.

Like Tiger Woods’s return to competitive form, updating the Rules of Golf has been a process.

But that process is now complete.

Having listened to input from golfers around the world, the game’s governing bodies Monday unveiled a final version of golf’s new rules, set to go into effect on Jan. 1, 2019.

Among other changes, they include fresh directives for how to take a drop, and an alternate solution for dealing with a lost ball or a ball knocked out of bounds. Clearer and more concise, the new rules are also kinder and gentler, with penalties softened in the name of pace of play and common sense.

“It’s been a long process but a gratifying one,” said Thomas Pagel, the USGA’s senior director of rules and amateur status. “Now comes the fun part where we get to share with the world everything that has been done.”

The world had a chance to have its say starting in March 2017, when the governing bodies put forth proposed revisions and opened them up to a six-month period of public feedback. During that time, more than 30,000 comments and suggestions poured in. That input had some sway.

While the majority of the proposed rules remain unaltered in the final version, there are several notable changes.

Take the dropping procedure. Last year’s proposal suggested that players be allowed to drop from as low as two inches off the ground, down from shoulder-height. Bad idea, the public said. Sure, a lower drop would help keep play moving by reducing the chance of a ball bounding out of the relief area and forcing a player to drop again. But two inches was too low. It was practically like placing the ball. If you were standing across the fairway from your playing partner, how could you be sure that they were dropping at all?

“A number of comments we received from all levels of the game wanted to see a certain amount of randomness maintained so that when you drop a ball, you’re not sure what kind of lie you’re going to get,” Pagel said. “But how do you ensure that randomness? Do you take it back to shoulder height? It was really about finding a balance of maintaining that randomness while also allowing the player to identify a relief area, drop there as quick as possible and play on.”

The new rules go into effect on Jan. 1, 2019.

The new rules go into effect on Jan. 1, 2019.

GETTY IMAGES

The compromise? When taking relief, golfers will now drop from knee height.

The guidelines for measuring a relief area have also changed. Under the new rules, golfers will be allowed either one club-length or two-club lengths, depending on the situation (if you’re taking relief from a cart path, for instance, you’ll get one club length; if you’re dropping from a lateral hazard, you’ll get two). Last year’s proposed revisions suggested a 20-inch or 80-inch standard.

One of the underlying principles of the new rules is that golfers should not be penalized for unintentional acts that result in no benefit to them. To that end, the penalty for a double-hit (known to some fans as a “T.C. Chen,” in honor of the golfer whose chances at the 1985 U.S. Open came undone when he struck his ball twice with a single swing) has been eliminated, which was not the case under last year’s proposed revisions. Golfers will simply count the additional stroke they made while striking the ball.

That revision is in keeping with another change in the rules, which eliminates the penalty for a ball in motion striking a player.

“They really mirror each other in the thinking behind them,” Pagel said. “Say a ball bounces off a bunker face and comes back and hits you in the chest, it’s accidental. And it’s certainly not to your benefit.”

Another of the notable changes will resonate with any golfer who ever suffered the double-edged indignity of losing a ball and then having to walk back to hit the shot again. The new guidelines include a local rule giving committees leeway to do away with the stroke-plus-distance penalty. That would give golfers the simpler, less time-consuming option of dropping in the vicinity of where their ball went out-of-bounds or missing, under a two-stroke penalty. This rule won’t apply to professional tournaments or other elite-level competitions. It’s meant to keep things moving in everyday club and recreational play.

For recreational players, the days of stroke-and-distance penalties are numbered.  

For recreational players, the days of stroke-and-distance penalties are numbered.

“The concern we kept hearing was, ‘I can’t go back because the golf course is already log-jammed and my going back is bad for pace of play,'” Pagel said. “This local rule essentially replicates what would have been a decent shot with stroke and distance while keeping the player moving forward, which as we know is critically important.”

“From all levels of the game, what we heard was that if you let people repair damage, they’ll either take forever to do it, or essentially build a trough between their ball and the hole,” Pagel said. “But if those are valid concerns, there are already rules in place to address them. If a player takes two minutes to clean up the line, then the pace of play rule takes effect. If the player improves more than what is reasonable, there is already a rule that says you can’t improve your line of play.”

All of these revisions will now go into a rulebook that incorporates a host of other proposals put forth last year, which include a range of relaxed rules on greens, bunkers and penalty areas as well as the elimination or reduction of penalties for accidentally moving a ball.

It’s a lot to digest. But with all the i’s dotted and t’s crossed, the governing bodies will now get busy getting the word out to golfers around the world.

Already, 30 “how-to-apply” videos and a summary of the principal changes are now available at usage.org/rules. Additional education tools will be released in September, in plenty of time for us all to get ready for Jan. 1.

SOURCE:  http://www.golf.com

 

Michelle Wie keeps putting herself back together again.

Broken down by injury or illness or slump so many times in her career, she keeps finding ways to overcome.

She did it again Sunday in brilliant fashion, coming from five shots behind in the final round to win the HSBC Women’s World Championship in Singapore with a dramatic putt at the final hole, a 36-foot birdie from just off the front of the green.

Wie thrust her fist into the sky when that last putt fell, and then she punched the air twice more in giddy delight.

“I think that has to be the best putt of my career so far,” she said.

Four long, frustrating years after winning the U.S. Women’s Open, Wie was finally able to claim her fifth LPGA title.

“It’s been a tough journey since 2014,” she said. “It’s been kind of well documented. I’ve had some injuries, had a really bad year, just lost a lot of confidence. I’m just really proud of myself for pulling myself out of it.”

Wie’s parents, B.J. and Bo, were in the gallery following, as they always are. Her parents have been scrutinized and criticized as much as any in the sport over their handling of the former phenom. Wie, 28, said they were on her mind when that last putt dropped.

https://twitter.com/LPGA/status/970203794653900800

“When I made the putt, I could just picture my parents kind of celebrating,” Wie said. “My family believed in me relentlessly, and with that, I started to believe in myself.”

Wie beat a star-studded lineup Sunday that included 19 of the top 20 players in the Rolex Women’s World Rankings.

“This is Asia’s major,” Wie said.

With a bogey-free 7-under-par 65, Wie prevailed in a crazy afternoon of high drama, breaking out of a four-way tie for the lead with that birdie at the last. She finished at 17 under overall, a shot ahead of Brooke Henderson (67), Danielle Kang (70), Nelly Korda (71) and Jenny Shin (65).

“Everyone was really clustered up there on the leaderboard,” Wie said. “I’m just really proud of myself for making a lot of birdies, and [to] keep going.”

So many players got in the mix on the back nine, with one player after another mounting charges. The course record was 64, but five players equaled or broke the mark in the final round.

After her closing birdie, Wie had to wait in the wings and watch Korda and Kang miss birdie chances at the last that could have forced a playoff.

The victory was sweet for Wie for a lot of reasons, including her inability to close out a 54-hole lead in this event a year ago.

“I just wanted to get revenge after last year a little bit,” Wie said. “I kind of came with a slight chip on my shoulder in the morning.”

Wie overcame so much winning that U.S. Women’s Open at Pinehurst in 2014, when she finally looked ready to realize all her potential in a run to No. 1. But, she was derailed by a finger injury later that summer, and then by hip, knee and ankle injuries that led to an awful slump after that. When she finally looked as if she was turning a corner again last year, neck spasms and an emergency appendectomy derailed her in the summer.

“Definitely, my team and my family and my friends have pulled me out of the hard times and kept me going,” Wie said. “There have been moments where it was hard. It was hard to keep going and to keep playing.”

Wie’s longtime swing coach, David Leadbetter, has been there through all the challenges with her since she was 13.

“I can’t list all the injuries Michelle has had in her career,” Leadbetter said at year’s start. “I don’t think there is one joint or bone in her body that hasn’t had some sort of injury or issue.

“The main goal this year is really to see if she can go injury free.”

Leadbetter believes Wie hasn’t reached what she’s really capable of yet, but he’s hopeful this might be the year. There was promise loaded in Sunday’s victory.

 

Source: http://www.golfchannel.com/

By AP NEWS

Sunday, February 25, 2018

PALM BEACH GARDENS, Fla. (AP) – Justin Thomas was down to his last chance when he delivered his most clutch shot of the final round in the Honda Classic.

Turns out he wasn’t finished.

Thomas nearly holed a gap wedge on the par-5 18th hole for a birdie to force a playoff with Luke List. Moments later, he hit 5-wood over the water, urged it to keep going and lost it momentarily in the darkening sky over PGA National.

“All I was looking at was the water to see if it splashed,” Thomas said. “And it didn’t. So I figured I was in the bunker, and then people started clapping and I could kind of see some little white dot on the green.”

That set up a two-putt birdie that made him a winner when List, who hit his own bold shot in regulation to the 18th to set up birdie, could only manage par in the playoff.

Thomas closed with a 2-under 68 and won for the second time this season. He also won in a playoff at the CJ Cup in South Korea last fall. With eight career victories, including seven in his last 31 starts on the PGA Tour, he moved to No. 3 in the world. He is one spot ahead of longtime friend Jordan Spieth for the first time, which was of little significance to Thomas.

“Not really,” he said. “Because there’s still two more spots that I want to climb.’

List, going for his first PGA Tour victory, shot 32 on the back nine and closed with a 69. His only regret was a tee shot wide right in the playoff that landed amid palm trees and left him little options. He went left against the bleachers, and hit a superb approach to about 25 feet and two-putted for par.

 

 

“Obviously, it hurts right now,” List said. “But I think that when I look back on it, I’ll be proud of the way I hung in there.”

Alex Noren (67) finished third. He was tied for the lead when he went for the green on the 18th, only for the ball to hit hung up on the side of the collar of a bunker, leaving him a tough chip. He missed a birdie chance from 20 feet.

Tiger Woods was briefly within three shots of the lead on the front nine. He closed with a 70 and finished 12th.

The 5-wood turned out to be the winner for Thomas. The wedge made it possible.

Jack Nicklaus was in the broadcast booth for most of the final round, leaving before Thomas and List reached the 18th hole. It might have all looked familiar to Nicklaus, the U.S. captain of the 1983 Ryder Cup at PGA National. The big moment that year was Lanny Wadkins nearly jarring a wedge on the 18th hole, a shot so meaningful to the outcome that Nicklaus kissed the divot.

Thomas missed the 18th fairway in regulation and had no choice but to lay up. List followed with his 4-iron to 35 feet.

“I have a lot of confidence in my wedge game,” Thomas said. “I knew if I got a decent number that I was going to be able to get inside 10 feet. That’s all I wanted was a chance to try to get into a playoff. And then ended up hitting a great wedge.”

Thomas and List finished at 8-under 272. It was the seventh playoff in 15 PGA Tour events this season.

Woods made that Sunday red shirt look a little brighter, at least for a while. With an 8-foot birdie putt on the par-4 eighth hole, he momentarily pulled within three shots of the lead. That only lasted the few minutes that it took Thomas to tap in for birdie on the par-5 third.

 

Woods made bogey to close out his front nine, and he still was four shots behind until getting swallowed up again by the water-filled closing stretch. He put his tee shot into water and made double bogey for the second straight day, three-putted the 16th for bogey and was out of hope.

“I made a big leap this week because I really hit it well,” Woods said. “I was able to control it, especially in this wind, which is not easy to do.”

Woods led the field in proximity to the hole on his approach shots at just over 29 feet.

Not to be overlooked was Sam Burns of LSU, who last year won the Jack Nicklaus Award as the top college player who received a sponsor exemption. Playing alongside Woods in such a chaotic arena, he was bogey-free for a 68 to tie for eighth. That will get him into the Valspar Championship at Innisbrook in two weeks.

Five players had at least a share of the lead. Only three of them stuck around until the end.

Webb Simpson missed the fairway on the 11th hole and had to lay up instead of taking on the water. That led to the first of three bogeys in a four-hole stretch and sent him to a 72, four shots behind. Tommy Fleetwood was tied for the lead until a three-putt bogey from long range on the 14th, and a bogey from the back bunker on the 15th. A birdie on the final hole for a 69 left him two shots behind.

Source: Golf.com

Happy Valentine’s Day!

from everyone at Sherwood Forest

Give the Gift of Golf!

What’s better than the gift of golf? Show your sweetheart you love them by gifting them a Sherwood Forest Golf Club gift card!

 

 

By SEAN ZAK

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

It was a quiet race for Chairman of the PGA Tour Advisory Council. That was until Billy Hurley III made a late splash this week.

Hurley III was going up against Jordan Spieth, Golden Child and no. 3 golfer in the world. It was tough competition, and with just one day left for Tour players to vote, he turned to a classic campaign strategy: mudslinging.

Hurley III released a video pinpointing all of Spieth’s flaws, from him being an elite, “one percenter” golfer, to the ways in which he treats his caddie Michael Greller. Beyond that, Hurley III called attention to his own military history.

The video swept across PGA Tour circles Monday, with many players tweeting it out saying Hurley III had captured their vote. Why? Well, because the video is hilarious and you’d need to watch it for yourself. The impact of the video was so great that Jordan Spieth himself even admitted he would vote for Hurley III.

 

Source: Golf.com

Score a victory for common sense.

It was announced Monday that beginning in 2018, golf’s major professional tours will no longer allow viewer call-ins to dictate potential rules violations captured on television broadcasts.

Golf fans no longer able to call in violations.

Golf fans will no longer be able to call in or email possible rules violations they witness while watching broadcasts of tournaments on television.

This is a triumph for the purists, for fans of the game who never believed the intricacies of the rule book should be enforced and litigated in the aftermath of such activity — and certainly not from a couch potato with a remote control in one hand and a phone dialing some clandestine number in the other.

This is a win for those who witnessed Tiger Woods’ post-round “witch hunt” at the 2013 Masters or Lexi Thompson’s called-in penalty at this year’s ANA Inspiration and felt queasy about the eventual result. After all, try calling in an NFL pass interference penalty or an NBA traveling violation from the comforts of home. Your opinion will be treated to nothing more than a lusty dial tone.

Tiger Woods lost two strokes after a viewer called in to say Woods made a bad drop after finding water on Augusta’s 15th hole during the second round of the 2013 Masters. Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images
Ostensibly, golf will now feature a similar lack of democracy, with on-site video officials charged with serving as the last line of defense in protecting the rules.

The worst part of the previous system wasn’t even the fact that random fans could adversely impact the very proceedings taking place inside a box mounted to their living room walls. It was that this was never a level playing field. Until the time when every golfer’s entire round was beamed live to spectators around the globe, this was always going to affect those being shown on camera more than their less visible counterparts.

Or perhaps more importantly: It was always going to impact a Sunday afternoon contender more than a Thursday morning competitor.

Just eight months ago, Thompson was nabbed by the gotcha-police when she was found to have improperly marked her ball on the green. She lost two strokes due to the violation, another two for signing an incorrect scorecard and wound up losing that major championship.

On Monday, she took to Twitter to address the revised rule: “I applaud the USGA and the R&A for their willingness to revise the Rules of Golf to address certain unfortunate situations that have arisen several times in the game of golf. In my case, I am thankful no one else will have to deal with an outcome such as mine in the future.”

It’s safe to say that Thompson’s result wasn’t the sole rationale for this decision, but golf’s powers-that-be should be commended for realizing that it was a perilous final straw.

“All involved with administering the game are concerned with the impact that these types of rulings were continuing to have,” explained Thomas Pagel, the USGA’s senior director for rules of golf and amateur status. “[The] new set of video-review protocols are not a direct result of the Lexi Thompson ruling, but it is safe to say that it was the last of several similar rulings that highlighted the need to act quickly on the matter.”

The genesis of viewer call-ins dates to the 1987 Andy Williams Open, in the landmark case of Craig Stadler vs. Building A Stance. In contention during the third round at Torrey Pines, the man known as the Walrus was forced to play a shot on his knees from under a tree. He placed a towel on the ground, later explaining, “I didn’t want to finish the round looking like a gardener.” One day later, a viewer called in from Iowa to point out the transgression. Since he’d already signed the card, a share of second place was deemed a disqualification.

Since then, golf’s caretakers have endured three decades of allowing unaffected observers to affect potential outcomes. All of which is why Monday’s announcement is being hailed as a celebration of the game’s long-awaited realization that self-enforcement beats citizen arrests.

Of course, like any unanimous call to action, the notable pros instantly outweigh the inscrutable cons. They do exist, though. Just wait until the first time a professional golfer unknowingly commits a violation that isn’t captured by the on-site video official, either. It won’t take long before the social-media masses raise their figurative pitchforks, wondering why their voices can no longer be heard.

That day might come, but for now, the celebration continues.

Too often, golf tournaments have been decided on something less than rational thinking. Common sense has prevailed in this match, even if it was long overdue.

Source: ESPN.com

Here’s a quick look at what each player in the field at East Lake will need to do to claim the FedExCup. The trophy, and its $10 million prize, will be awarded at the conclusion of the TOUR Championship.

* = A possible tie for the FedExCup that would result in a sudden death playoff

RANK PLAYER WINNING SCENARIOS
+

1 Jordan Spieth Jordan Spieth

• If he wins the TOUR Championship, he wins the FedExCup
• Has a reasonable chance of winning with a top-five finish
• Can finish as low as 29th and still have a mathematical chance of winning

2 Justin Thomas Justin Thomas

• If he wins the TOUR Championship, he wins the FedExCup
• Has a reasonable chance of winning with a top-three finish
• Can finish as low as a 2-way tie for 6th and still have a mathematical chance of winning

3 Dustin Johnson Dustin Johnson

• If he wins the TOUR Championship, he wins the FedExCup
• Has a reasonable chance of winning with a second-place finish
• Can finish as low as T4 and still have a mathematical chance of winning

4 Marc Leishman Marc Leishman

• If he wins the TOUR Championship, he wins the FedExCup
• Has a reasonable chance of winning with a second-place finish
• Can finish as low as T3 and still have a mathematical chance of winning

5 Jon Rahm Jon Rahm

• If he wins the TOUR Championship, he wins the FedExCup
• Can finish as low as a 2-way tie for 2nd and still have a mathematical chance of winning

6 Rickie Fowler Rickie Fowler

Must win the TOUR Championship AND
• No. 1 must finish T2 or worse
• Can finish second and still have a mathematical chance of winning

7 Hideki Matsuyama Hideki Matsuyama

Must win the TOUR Championship AND
• No. 1 must finish in a three-way tie for 2nd or worse
• No. 2 must finish T2 or worse

8 Justin Rose Justin Rose

Must win the TOUR Championship, AND
• No. 1 must finish third or worse*
• No. 2 must finish T2 or worse*
• No. 3 must finish second or worse.*

9 Brooks Koepka Brooks Koepka

Must win the TOUR Championship, AND
• No. 1 must finish in a 3-way tie for third or worse
• No. 2 must finish third or worse
• No. 3 must finish T2 or worse
• No. 4 must finish second or worse*

10 Paul Casey Paul Casey

Must win the TOUR Championship, AND
• No. 1 must finish fifth or worse
• No. 2 must finish in a 3-way tie for third or worse
• No. 3 must finish in a 3-way tie for second or worse
• No. 4 must finish T2 or worse
• No. 5 must finish second or worse*

11 Pat Perez Pat Perez

• Must win the TOUR Championship, AND
• No. 1 must finish T6 or worse
• No. 2 must finish T4 or worse
• No. 3 must finish T3 or worse
• No. 4 must finish in a 3-way tie for second or worse
• No. 5 must finish T2 or worse

12 Matt Kuchar Matt Kuchar

Must win the TOUR Championship, AND
• No. 1 must finish in a 3-way tie for 6th or worse
• No. 2 must finish T4 or worse
• No. 3 must finish T3 or worse
• No. 4 must finish in a 3-way tie for second or worse
• No. 5 must finish T2 or worse

13 Charley Hoffman Charley Hoffman

Must win the TOUR Championship, AND
• No. 1 must finish T7 or worse
• No. 2 must finish T4 or worse
• No. 3 must finish T3 or worse
• No. 4 must finish in a 3-way tie for second or worse
• No. 5 must finish T2 or worse

14 Daniel Berger Daniel Berger

Must win the TOUR Championship, AND
• No. 1 must finish T8 or worse
• No. 2 must finish T4 or worse
• No. 3 must finish T3 or worse
• No. 4 must finish in a 3-way tie for second or worse
• No. 5 must finish T2 or worse

15 Jason Day Jason Day

Must win the TOUR Championship, AND
• No. 1 must finish ninth or worse*
• No. 2 must finish T4 or worse*
• No. 3 must finish T3 or worse
• No. 4 must finish in a 3-way tie for second or worse
• No. 5 must finish T2 or worse

16 Webb Simpson Webb Simpson

• Must win the TOUR Championship, AND
• No. 1 must finish in a 3-way tie for ninth or worse
• No. 2 must finish in a 3-way tie for fourth or worse
• No. 3 must finish T3 or worse
• No. 4 must finish third or worse
• No. 5 must finish T2 or worse

17 Jhonattan Vegas Jhonattan Vegas

Must win the TOUR Championship, AND
• No. 1 must finish in a 3-way tie for tenth or worse
• No. 2 must finish in a 3-way tie for fourth or worse
• No. 3 must finish in a 3-way tie for third or worse
• No. 4 must finish third or worse
• No. 5 must finish T2 or worse

18 Kevin Kisner Kevin Kisner

Must win the TOUR Championship, AND
• No. 1 must finish T-11 or worse
• No. 2 must finish fifth or worse
• No. 3 must finish in a 3-way tie for third or worse
• No. 4  must finish third or worse
• No. 5 must finish in a 3-way tie for second or worse

19 Kevin Chappell Kevin Chappell

Must win the TOUR Championship, AND
• No. 1 must finish T12 or worse
• No. 2 must finish fifth or worse
• No. 3 must finish in a 3-way tie for third or worse
• No. 4 must finish third or worse
• No. 5 must finish in a 3-way tie for second or worse
• No. 6 must finish T2 or worse

20 Brian Harman Brian Harman

Must win the TOUR Championship, AND
• No. 1 must finish in a 3-way tie for 12th or worse
• No. 2 must finish fifth or worse
• No. 3 must finish in a 3-way tie for third or worse
• No. 4 must finish third or worse
• No. 5 must finish in a 3-way tie for second or worse
• No. 6 must finish T2 or worse

21 Adam Hadwin Adam Hadwin

Must win the TOUR Championship, AND
• No. 1 must finish 13th or worse*
• No. 2 must finish fifth or worse*
• No. 3 must finish in a 3-way tie for third or worse
• No. 4 must finish third or worse*
• No. 5 must finish in a 3-way tie for second or worse
• No. 6 must finish T-2 or worse

22 Kyle Stanley Kyle Stanley

Must win the TOUR Championship, AND
• No. 1 must finish in a 3-way tie for 13th or worse
• No. 2 must finish T5 or worse
• No. 3 must finish in a 3-way tie for third or worse
• No. 4 must finish T3 or worse
• No. 5 must finish in a 3-way tie for second or worse
• No. 6 must finish T2 or worse

23 Patrick Reed Patrick Reed

Must win the TOUR Championship, AND
• No. 1 must finish 15th or worse*
• No. 2 must finish T5 or worse
• No. 3 must finish in a 3-way tie for third or worse
• No. 4 must finish T3 or worse
• No. 5 must finish in a 3-way tie for second or worse
• No. 6 must finish T2 or worse

24 Tony Finau Tony Finau

Must win the TOUR Championship, AND
• No. 1 must finish 17th or worse*
• No. 2 must finish in a 3-way tie for fifth or worse
• No. 3 must finish in a 3-way tie for third or worse
• No. 4 must finish T3 or worse
• No. 5 must finish in a 3-way tie for second or worse
• No. 6 must finish T2 or worse

25 Sergio Garcia Sergio Garcia

Must win the TOUR Championship, AND
• No. 1 must finish 19th or worse*
• No. 2 must finish in a 3-way tie for fifth or worse
• No. 3 must finish fourth or worse
• No. 4 must finish T3 or worse
• No. 5 must finish in a 3-way tie for second or worse
• No. 6 must finish T2 or worse

26 Xander Schauffele Xander Schauffele

Must win the TOUR Championship, AND
• No. 1 must finish 21st or worse*
• No. 2 must finish sixth or worse*
• No. 3 must finish fourth or worse*
• No. 4 must finish T-3 or worse
• No. 5 must finish in a 3-way tie for second or worse
• No. 6 must finish T-2 or worse

27 Russell Henley Russell Henley

Must win the TOUR Championship, AND
• No. 1 must finish 23rd or worse*
• No. 2 must finish T6 or worse
• No. 3 must finish T4 or worse
• No. 4 must finish T3 or worse
• No. 5 must finish in a 3-way tie for second or worse
• No. 6 must finish T-2 or worse

28 Gary Woodland Gary Woodland

Must win the TOUR Championship, AND
• No. 1 must finish 25th or worse*
• No. 2 must finish T6 or worse
• No. 3 must finish T4 or worse
• No. 4 must finish T3 or worse
• No. 5 must finish in a 3-way tie for second or worse
• No. 6 must finish T2 or worse

29 Patrick Cantlay Patrick Cantlay

Must win the TOUR Championship, AND
• No. 1 must finish 27th or worse*
• No. 2 must finish in a 3-way tie for sixth or worse
• No. 3 must finish T4 or worse
• No. 4 must finish T3 or worse
• No. 5 must finish in a 3-way tie for second or worse
• No. 6 must finish T2 or worse

30 Jason Dufner Jason Dufner

Must win the TOUR Championship, AND
• No. 1 must finish 29th or worse*
• No. 2 must finish in a 3-way tie for 6th or worse
• No. 3 must finish T4 or worse
• No. 4 must finish T3 or worse
• No. 5 must finish in a 3-way tie for second or worse
• No. 6 must finish T2 or worse

Source: PGATOUR.COM

Another one of golf’s most well-known player/caddie duos is splitting up.

According to a report from Reuters, Rory McIlroy has fired longtime caddie J.P. Fitzgerald and will have a new looper on his bag for this week’s WGC-Bridgestone Invitational. Reuters cited a source familiar with the situation. McIlroy’s management team has yet to make any announcement and has not immediately responded to GOLF.com’s request for comment.

Fitzgerald and McIlroy have been together for nine years and for all of McIlroy’s four major championships, including his ascent to No. 1 in the world in 2012. Fitzgerald was thrust into the spotlight at the British Open last week. McIlroy bogeyed five of his first six holes in his opening round but rebounded to shoot 71. He praised Fitzgerald for helping him turn the tide, as McIlroy finished tied for fourth.

The 28-year-old hasn’t won a major since the 2014 PGA Championship but is considered a heavy favorite for next week’s PGA at Quail Hollow in Charlotte. He’s won on the course twice already for the Wells Fargo Championship, most recently in 2015 when he shot a course-record 61 in the third round and won by seven.

This news comes just one month after Phil Mickelson and Jim “Bones” Mackay announced their mutual split after 25 years together.

Source: Golf.com